Women’s highest percentage submission hold vs men

Women’s highest percentage submission hold vs men

Stats show that women’s highest percentage submission hold vs men is the heelhook. Observations – women sparring men in Jiu-Jitsu: Probably one of the toughest assignments in all of Jiu-Jitsu is for a woman to submit a male who has the same amount of training time and the size and strength disadvantage that is typically found in this scenario. Over many years of observing mixed classes with men and women grappling each other I came to the conclusion that by far the most successful submission hold for women when they take on trained men is the heel hook. Nothing else is even close in my experience. Let me explain this. The strength discrepancy between men and women is much more pronounced in the upper body than lower body. It is particularly pronounced in hand and arm strength. The discrepancy between men and women in lower body strength is far less pronounced. When two men of different size and strength clash I usually favor strangles from the back as the best submission hold for the smaller and weaker fellow – but in the case of women versus men I frequently observe that the big difference in hand/arm strength means that women struggle to win the hand fight that precedes strangulation (the rear triangle works much better for women in this scenario and it is my belief that rear triangle is second best submission for women against men after heel hook). Most of the other classic upper body submissions such as arm bars, Kimura, front triangles run afoul of the arm/upper body strength discrepancy and as such appear to be quite problematic for many females to use against similarly skilled males. Even most leg locks are problematic – knee bars and toe holds require considerable arm and hand strength in application and so have proven difficult to apply in mixed sparring – but the heel hook lets women use their considerable leg strength and dexterity to great effect with relatively little interference from males advantages in hand/arm and upper torso strength – as such I have seen more mixed grappling scenarios in the gym over the years won by heel hooks (especially inside heel hooks) than any other by a very considerable margin. Let both women and men take note – when there is a big strength difference heel hooks are among your best friends!

Passing half guard in BJJ

Passing half guard in BJJ

Passing the half guard in BJJ can sometimes be a chore. But the secret is pressure! Pressure passing…. the power of half guard. There are many ways to create pressure while passing your opponents guard, but in my opinion half guard passing is the best for pressure for the simple reason that it offers direct control of the opponents head, which creates the strongest forms of pressure. you control the head, you control the body. The ability to exert pressure over time is perhaps the single biggest determinant of success or failure at championship level. Working your way to half guard and getting control of the head gives you what I consider the best pressure passing method in the game. It works equally well in all three areas of sport jiu-jitsu, (gi or no gi) and MMA. Here, our student Dan Czarnecki uses it brilliantly in his double gold medal performance at NJBJJF Tournament.

Takedown philosophy in BJJ

Takedown philosophy in BJJ

There is a lot to takedown philosophy in BJJ. That is because there is a lot more to the standing game of BJJ than takedowns: When most people think of standing skills in Jiu-Jitsu, they understandably think automatically in terms of takedowns. However, there are many other skills of great importance. Let’s consider takedown defense for example. In BJJ, a successful takedown scores two points in competition. A strong counter to takedown that exposes an opponents back and enables you to secure rear mount will score double that – four points. So clearly, takedown defense is a potentially very profitable skill that gets widely overlooked in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Let’s look at pulling guard. This is typically seen as a defeatist strategy which intent is to prevent an opponent scoring on you (usually because you believe he has superior takedown skills to you). What if we changed our thinking a little and instead of passively pulling guard, we pulled directly to a sweep from guard? Pulling directly to a guard sweep is no more difficult than pulling guard. Now you can use guard pulling as a mean to score rather than a way to avoid being scored on. Interestingly you will score the same amount (two points) as you would have scored with a takedown. What if an opponent pulls guard on you? Most people just see this as an invitation to play the ground game. What if you saw it as an opportunity to score a quick guard passing off the pull? Now your up three points (more than a takedown) and putting your opponent under real pressure from the start. What about instead of pulling guard you pulled directly to a submission hold? An arm lock, leg lock or strangle? Then the whole damn match would be over! You can see that there are many very potentially lucrative standing skills that get far less attention than they ought to. Perhaps you can among the first to develop these and make them a feature of your game and reap the benefits!

Every submission has an escape in BJJ

Every submission has an escape in BJJ

Every submission has an escape in BJJ. The key is to identify the problem. Every escape involves a set of movements – but invariably there is ONE movement that does the majority of the work of escape. For example in upper body submission holds from guard involving your legs such as triangle, closed guard arm bar, omoplata etc – most of the early escapes are postural escapes involving your opponents HEAD rising away from you to create distance and this is the core of the escape/defense overall. Once you understand this as the athlete trying to perform the submission it’s all a matter of building increasingly powerful HEAD CONTROL as the basis of your submission game from guard. Focus upon the most pressing problem pays big dividends in Jiu-Jitsu. In a word of ten thousand problems learning to focus on the biggest ones first makes a big difference to your performance. Under stress it’s much easier to solve one bigger problem than a dozen smaller ones simultaneously. Develop a clear idea of what the biggest threat to your success is and attack that threat relentlessly – you will soon notice the difference in your performance

Best BJJ training is sparring tired

Best BJJ training is sparring tired

The best BJJ training is sparring tired. It’s common to feel utterly exhausted some days in the middle of your sparring rounds. Sometimes you come in feeling fine and have a couple of very tough rounds and feel very fatigued. It’s natural to feel like stopping, maybe taking off a round a two and then starting again. You think this way because you are thinking in terms of winning or losing rounds rounds. If you’re exhausted it’s going to be very difficult to win and quite likely you’ll lose to your next partner. So you take some rounds off and start again when you’ve recovered a little. This not good if you want to play at a competitive level. Doing this means you will never get the experience of performing through exhaustion. Change your mindset. Tell yourself – I’m exhausted – but I will keep going with a lowered set of expectations. Let’s imagine I’m ahead in a tough match and have to protect my lead and not get submitted. This will simulate the skill of operating under great fatigue and duress – a common thing in tough matches. You don’t want the finals of a tough competition to be the first time you do this – your own mind will start to fight against you – learn to tame it in the gym first and it will be much better than trying to learn it in the middle of a big match. Obviously if you are more recreational, older, perhaps not in competition shape, this will not apply as much, but you can still experiment with it to some degree. Remember, you don’t have to stop completely, just lower your goals and keep going – you will learn a lot about yourself in those rounds. In addition, training while tired teaches you to always use your technique, which will come in handy vs larger opponents. Always check our news sections at www.njbjj.com for more advice

Dictating pace in Jiu-Jitsu

Dictating pace in Jiu-Jitsu

Dictating pace in Jiu-Jitsu is one of the keys to success on the mat. Whatever your opponent wants to do – do the opposite: BJJ can seem like a very complex game at times, but in some ways it is very simple. It is a classic zero-sum game in the sense  what ever is good for one player is by definition bad for the other. If you know what the other guy need in order to perform a given move, you can do pretty damn well by doing the opposite of what he needs. That’s why learning how to attack with a given move often educates you very well in how to defend it, and learning to defend it often makes you better at attacking with it. Whenever you drill a given move, get a feel of what the three main mechanical requirements for its success are – that will give a good insight into what you must do to stop it being used successfully against you in the future.

Whatever the other fellow wants – do the opposite: BJJ can seem like a very complex game at times, but in some ways it is very simple. It is a classic zero-sum game; what ever is good for one player is by definition bad for the other. If you know what the other guy need in order to perform a given move, you can do pretty damn well by doing the opposite of what he needs. That’s why learning how to attack with a given move often educates you very well in how to defend it, and learning to defend it often makes you better at attacking with it. Whenever you drill a given move, get a feel of what the three main mechanical requirements for its success are – that will give a good insight into what you must do to stop it being used successfully against you in the future.

How to improve while injured in BJJ

How to improve while injured in BJJ

 

How to improve while injured in BJJ has an easy answer-watch class. It really is that simple. Watching BJJ class: Whenever my students are injured, I usually encourage them to come in periodically and watch classes from the sideline. Why? When you can’t train your body – train your MIND. Remember always that the mind governs our actions. You want a faster game in JiuJitsu? That will require a mind that can process options faster just as much as a faster body. The problem is that when most people watch BJJ they FOLLOW the action rather than try to JUDGE and ANTICIPATE the action. They look only at the RESULT rather than the PROCESSES that brought about the results. When you watch, picture yourself out there and ask yourself second by second what you would be doing in their stead. How you would respond to other fellows attacks and defenses. Get engaged when you watch. The mental workout is every bit as useful and productive as the physical one the athletes on the mat are having.

 

Defense first in BJJ

Defense first in BJJ

Something we have really been stressing lately at Savarese BJJ is defense first in BJJ. How good are you at getting out of bad positions? Whenever people ask me to diagnose their skill level one of the first things I observe is their skill at getting out of bad positions. Why? Because that will tell me not only how good they are DEFENSIVELY but also OFFENSIVELY. This might strike you as strange. How can defensive skill reflect your offensive skill? Simple – the more faith you have in your defense the more risks you will take with your offense. Your success will always be determined by the amount of risk you are willing to subject yourself to. As they say – NOTHING RISKED, NOTHING GAINED. If you won’t take the risk associated with offense you’ll never even begin an attack. If you’re afraid that when you try to attack you may be open to positional counters that leave you pinned in holds from which you can’t escape – then you won’t take the risk of attacking. The only thing that will liberate you from those fears that hold you back is the belief that you can escape any hold. The moment you believe that you will attack and hold nothing back.

Back control mastery in BJJ

Back control mastery in BJJ

Back control mastery in BJJ can be tricky. it can also take a while to learn. When you’re starting on the path to back control mastery – focus on the upper body first: The back is the most dominant position in a grappling match without striking. Nothing else creates such a mismatch between the control and submission opportunities of the attacker vs the defender. The SCORE comes from the legs – getting your two legs hooked into an opponents hips is what creates the score. However, the real world control comes from maintaining chest to back connection with or without the legs. When you first begin the back game – focus on the upper body connection first and foremost. You can always get the hooks in later to score. Use your arms in seatbelt or double under control to form a tight initial connection and create a strangle threat. As you get more advanced you’ll find there are ways you can get legs in first without conventional upper body connection but they aren’t the best place to start since you’ll be using those far less than conventional methods. Some of the worlds best use a safety first upper body connection to secure themselves in a winning position, knowing that once this is done, getting the legs in later will be relatively easy

BJJ, like a fight, isn’t always fair

BJJ, like a fight, isn’t always fair

BJJ, like a fight, isn’t always fair. Life isn’t fair – neither should be your Jiu-Jitsu: Fair play is a wonderful thing but not in Jiu-Jitsu. Your whole game is to create an uneven playing field using mechanics and tactics that put your opponent at a disadvantage that makes your victory very likely. One of the best ways to begin doing this is to trap opponents arms. One of the quickest ways to render a human helpless is to pin his arms – that’s why the first thing police officers do with unruly suspects is handcuff them. It’s a simple way of making dangerous people harmless. So too when you do it it in BJJ. If you can trap an arm and pin it down you can render a strong opponent helpless. Our favorite time to do this is when you’re behind someone. It makes the task of strangulation so much easier. Don’t be satisfied with the rear mount – go further and trap an arm whenever possible (and if you know what your doing it usually is possible ). Defending your neck is difficult enough with two hands – with only one (the other one trapped) is VERY difficult indeed. Make a serious study of UNFAIRNESS and you will have advanced your understanding of the true nature of Jiu-Jitsu