Master Royler Gracie seminar at Savarese Jiu-Jitsu Lyndhurst

Master Royler Gracie seminar at Savarese Jiu-Jitsu Lyndhurst

 

Master Royler Gracie seminar at Savarese Jiu-Jitsu Lyndhurst! Royler Gracie is the son of Gracie jiu jitsu Grandmaster Helio Gracie and a legend in jiu jitsu and submission wrestling of his own merit, having been the first “King of BJJ’s Featherweight Division” setting the record of world championships at the time. Royler Gracie also ventured in mixed martial arts (MMA) ending his career in 2006, and excelled as a coach, leading the Gracie Humaitá academy in Rio de Janeiro, developing fighters like “Megaton” DiasAlexandre RibeiroOmar SalumRenato Barreto and many others. The seminar will be held at the Academy of Professor Chris Savarese, who eared his blackbelt from Gracie.

Main Achievements:

  • World Champion (1996, 1997, 1998, 1999)
  • Pan American Champion (1997, 1999)
  • ADCC Champion (1999, 2000, 2001)

Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu team shines at IBJJF NJ OPEN

Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu team shines at IBJJF NJ OPEN

Savarese Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, a Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu team shined at the IBJJF NJ Open saturday. The long time team, one of NJ best since 2006, had an incredible showing in what was reported to be the largest non World Championshionship BJJ tournament in history. The IBJJF reported on their website (www.ibjjf.com) that the IBJJF NJ International Open had the most competitors in the history of IBJJF International Opens. Professor Chris Savarese, the school owner and instructor said “Overall a pretty good day at an unbelievably STACKED NJ Open. There was A LOT of great talent there today w some incredible performances from some top athletes. We more than held our own with only 5 competitors taking home 3 bronze medals 🥉🥉🥉and a bunch of wins home. The one thing I could say is, we were in position to win every single match that we had today and that’s all I could ask for my athletes. Great job today everyone, I’m always proud of those who put it on the line because they aren’t afraid to fail. To say that our Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu team shined at the IBJJF NJ Open is fair. oss.” The team has a record of 11-5 on the day.
To find out more information about this team, contact the Academy at 201 933-5134 or visit them online at (www.njbjj.com).

Screenshot

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Jiu-Jitsu Changes Lives

Jiu-Jitsu Changes Lives

Jiu-Jitsu Changes Lives, written by professor Chris Savarese (www.njbjj.com)

I was reading some of my 1st BJJ instructors David Adiv blogs the other day and it made me think of my training journey through BJJ and all of the benefits and things that happened in my life because I started doing BJJ. I started writing them down and while it is a very rough list, I read it when I was done and thought about how different my life would be (and where I would be) if I never started or quit. here is the list:
-The Belief that i can accomplish anything I put my mind to
-made great, positive friends (and in 2 different countries)
-taught me to defend and stand up for myself
-Stopped drinking alcohol
-visited california for the 1st time, something I dreamed about as a kid.
-visited 2 different countries
-visited, competed in and reffed in over 15 states across the US
-eat healthier food (and learned about food)
-learned how to understand Portuguese (a little..lol)
-Stopped making excuses and started getting stuff done
-taught me to set goals and set them high (I set goals every year)
-taught me to respect others and realize everyone is fighting a battle of their own
-made me a more patient person
-gave me better Self control
-gave me great role models who helped make me who I am today
-gave me the opportunity to help people change their lives.
-gave the opportunity to give back to the community i grew up in
-gave others a way to make a living and others, met their spouse and had children after meeeting at my academy
-and after a horrific injury, it taught me how to never give up and how to persevere
-I try to be a better person everyday because of Jiu-Jitsu.
I wish I could make everyone take jiu-jitsu because
BJJ changes lives

3 things that influence you

3 things that influence you

There are three things that influence you, your actions, your success and what you think you’re able to achieve in life…
1) The thoughts that occupy your mind. What you think about the most is what you’ll amount to the fastest.
2) The people you surround yourself with.
3) The words that you choose to use throughout the day.
I’ve talked about the first two plenty of times, but I haven’t talked about your vocabulary… specifically the words that you use every day that influence your actions and get deep into your subconscious mind and drive your day to day thoughts an actions.
I’ve found that these 7 word can really screw with your subconscious mind and cause you to sabotage yourself – and you may not even realize it.
So if I had it my way, the world’s population would do away with using these 7 words…
1) When. When I have time I’m going to start a fitness program, a diet, or work on my business. When… as in you have NO control over your life and time? WTF?!
2) Someday. Someday I’ll be famous, rich, travel, own a home, start a family. “Someday” is NOT a day of the week.
3) Want. I want to travel, be successful, own a home. Never, ever want for anything!
4) Wish. I wish I could do that. I wish I could be like him/her. Stop wishing and do it.
5) Can’t. I can’t do that… I can’t go… I can’t afford it. How about you choose not to go, choose not to afford it, or choose to not do that.
The word can’t make it seem like you have no control over the circumstance in your life.
6) Try. I’ll try to be there. I’ll try to do that. There is no try, you either will or won’t – Yoda.
7) Never. I’ll never be able to do that.
Listen, you can do whatever you want in life. No one controls you.
You’re in charge.
You’re the CEO of your life.
You manage your time, your energy, and your actions.
Never, ever be a victim of circumstance. Never use words that defeat you.
Man up, and take charge of your life.
I believe in you!

Chris Savarese (www.njbjj.com)

Don’t let your child quit!

Don’t let your child quit!

Don’t let your child quit!

“My child wants to quit.”
Over the years We’ve heard this statement thousands of times.
To be very clear and honest about this statement.
Children don’t quit things, parents do.
This statement is usually a way to play mental gymnastics on who’s responsibility it is to make decisions on what’s best for our family.
By saying “my child wants to quit” it takes the responsibility and ownership of what really happened off our shoulders.
We see these things often enough to see very common threads in how this happens:
1. The car ride to and from practice becomes a place to share the disappointment with their performance.
2. Conversations are had in front of children about how we as parents disagree with something the coaches do causing a loss of trust in the child’s eyes.
3. The kids caught us on a day where we felt like being “lazy” and got us to agree to let them stay home from practice. This creates a sense of “it’s okay to skip” attitude in kids….. they will not only do this over and over, they will actually start to fight you because it was “okay” once.
4. Kids were allowed to quit prior commitments with no consequences.
………
A few questions to ask yourself when this thought arises:
1. Would I let my child quit school?
2. Would I let my child make all their own rules?
3. Just because my child doesn’t like things that are good for them, should I let them eat nothing but junk food.
4. Would I like my child to go down a path of self-destructive behaviors with real-world consequences?
………
Here’s the thing.
Someday you’re going to be the bad guy.
Someday they’ll be mad that you made them go.
Someday you’ll be tired or sick and not want to leave the house.
Someday you’ll want to play hookie.
Someday you won’t be their friend.
Someday. They. Will. Thank. You.
They’ll thank you for all the lessons you taught them.
They’ll come to you and say “now that I have my own kids I completely understand why you did those things.”
They’ll respect your hard choices.
It. Will. Be. Worth. It.
Not tomorrow, next week or even next month.
30 years from now.
It. Will. Be. Worth. It.

Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu blackbelts receive prestigious rank

Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu blackbelts receive prestigious rank

Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu blackbelts receive prestigious rank! Savarese Jiu-Jitsu blackbelts Ariana Lynn Zeppetelli and Leo Alves were promoted to to rank of Jiu-Jitsu “Professor” by head instructor Chris Savarese last night. Last night was a very special night at our Academy. Congrats to. Leo Alves and Ariana Lynn Zeppetelli on receiving their “Professor stripes” on their blackbelts. This is a big honor at our Academy, a rank given only to those that are black belts for over one year and are dedicated to teaching the art of Jiu-Jitsu and passing on their knowledge to others. Not every black belt will receive this rank, not many exemplified the rank a professor like these two, they started in my Academy as kids, and now we true leaders to all the ladies and students coming up in our Academy. They are the types of students that exemplify what Savarese Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is all about to say I’m proud of them is an understatement. I wish I was a camera so I could take a picture with my mind and put it in a frame for them to see how special they are to me. Congrats 🤙🏻

 

Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu student wins 2024 International Masters IBJJF Jiu-Jitsu Championship

Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu student wins 2024 International Masters IBJJF Jiu-Jitsu Championship

Lyndhurst Jiu-Jitsu student wins 2024 International Masters IBJJF Jiu-Jitsu Championship! Congrats to Thomas Thibodeaux of Savarese Jiu-Jitsu Academy in Lyndhurst on winning the 2024 International Masters IBJJF Jiu-Jitsu Championship in California today, one week after saving his company from an crazed ex-employee! Busy week. Guy is amazing!

All reactions:

Domi Timonera, Thomas Thibodeaux and 45 others

Training your worst skill in BJJ


Training your worst skill in BJJ

Training your worst skill in BJJ is something that must be done more often. What is your worst skill? Every BJJ practitioner, you, me, everybody, has a worst skill. Some part of the game that falls far behind their other skills. We all carry it around as a burden and hope it does not show up in sparring or competition. A great project for allJiu-Jitsu students is to identify the worst element of your game. It can be a move, say for example, the deadly triangle choke or a position, say, weak side bottom half guard. Whatever it is, identify it, then study it. Ask your instructor about it and also study great athletes/competitors who have a reputation for excellence in that area/position. Then set a very manageable goal for yourself. For three weeks, start every sparring session in that position or move and spend basically all of your training times for those 3 weeks in that specific area of technique. Initially you will feel awful and mentally defeated. Don’t get discouraged. Understand this, in learning activities, the greatest jump in skill level occurs every in training and then decreases over time. I promise you that after a rough start you will make astounding progress in that area in a relatively short time. Will you be a world beater? No, but you will be considerably better and put yourself in a position to improve over time. Most importantly, you will not see that area as an area of weakness as longer, but as an area of growth in the future.  one of the biggest things we teach here at Savarese BJJ academy (www.bergencountybjj.com) is ‘in order to succeed, often times we must fail first”.  Once you see it in that light, then you can move forward with that move/position as part of your overall progress, rather than make progress in some areas and just leave that one behind and hope it never gets exposed.

Winner vs Losers


WINNERS vs LOSERS
The Winner: Is always a part of the answer
The loser: Is always a part of the problem
The Winner: Always has a program
The Loser: Always has an Excuse
The Winner: Says “Let me do it for you”
The Loser: Says “Thats not my job”
The Winner: Sees an answer for every problem
The Loser: Sees a problem in every answer
The Winner: Sees a green near every sand trap
The Loser: Sees two or three sand traps near every green
The Winner: Says “It may be difficult but it’s possible”
The Loser: Says “It may be possible but it’s too difficult”
When a winner makes a mistake, he says, “I was wrong;”
When a loser makes a mistake, he says, “It wasn’t my fault.”
A winner works harder than a loser and has more time;
A loser is always “too busy” to do what is necessary.
A winner goes through a problem:
A loser goes around it, and never gets past it.
A winner makes commitments;
A loser makes promises.
A winner says, “I’m good, but not as good as I ought to be;”
A loser says, “I’m not as bad as a lot of other people.”
A winner listens;
A loser just waits until it’s his turn to talk.
A winner respects those who are superior to him and tries to learn something from them;
A loser resents those who are superior to him and tries to find chinks in their armor.
A winner feels responsible for more than his job;
A loser says, “I only work here.”
A winner says, “There ought to be a better way to do it;”
A loser says, “That’s the way it’s always been done here.

Learning is difficult in beginning of BJJ


Learning is difficult in beginning of BJJ

Learning is difficult in beginning of BJJ. If it wasn’t, you’d already know everything you needed to know. When it comes to new things, Jiu-Jitsu asks you to walk the line between tension and fear. Any time you try to learn something new, whether it’s a total paradigm shift or just adding important details to something that’s already there, it’s easy to get stuck.
What sticks you to the spot isn’t fear of something new or fear of change, even though both of these are charges often levied at the burden of learning. It’s the tension of uncertainty, the competing concerns between “will this work†and “this might not workâ€. It’s the stress of wondering whether if I learn this, will it benefit me…or distract me? In my experience, this tension is the hallmark of a great educational experience. A truly new idea or experience places you on a threshold…where you used to be vs. where you are going. You may sometimes expose yourself to a little tension willingly, but often we hesitate when we have the opportunity to learn something new. It doesn’t have to be this way. You can choose to actively seek out this pressure, the experience of being on the threshold and seeing the next few steps without seeing the whole staircase. When you do, you let what’s new push over you over the edge and out onto the other side. I often tell my students at Savarese BJJ (www.njbjj.com) that if you get by the 1st 6 months of training, you will train forever because you already did the worst part.